Music Thread

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Ok, time to liven up a moribund thread. I was listening to "Can't Get There From Here" by REM today. As Georgia residents, they name dropped the town of Philomath, Georgia into the lyrics.

First of all, does anyone besides @okeefe4prez know where Philomath is? According to REM's Michael Stipe it's near Lexington near the South Carolina border. So I got to thinking, what US city is name dropped more than any other in popular music? My money is on New Orleans.

Also heard "The Zoo" by The Scorpions. Here's another question. Is there a better example out there of a band's best song being on one of it's shittiest albums? Animal Magnetism is a serious letdown after Taken By Force, Tokyo Tapes, and Lovedrive and has an offensive sexist album cover to boot. But that song just rocks and that riff is one of the most recognized in heavy metal.

Maybe "Kings And Queens" by Aerosmith off the lackluster Draw The Line. Any other examples?
 

Fryowa

Administrator
Here's another question. Is there a better example out there of a band's best song being on one of it's shittiest albums?

Maybe "Kings And Queens" by Aerosmith off the lackluster Draw The Line. Any other examples?
For me it has to be Atlantic City on Jericho by The Band. Love The Band but Jericho don’t cut the mustard.

The Atlantic City track, however...is a fucking masterpiece and blows Springsteen’s version out of the ocean. Garth Hudson’s interpretation on the accordion is out of this world.

Bruce made a billion dollars over his career, but he he’s still a guy who’s a waaaaaaay better songwriter than performer. The best versions of his songs are those that are done by other people.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
For me it has to be Atlantic City on Jericho by The Band. Love The Band but Jericho don’t cut the mustard.

The Atlantic City track, however...is a fucking masterpiece and blows Springsteen’s version out of the ocean. Garth Hudson’s interpretation on the accordion is absolutely out of this world.

Bruce made a billion dollars over his career, but he he’s still a guy who’s a waaaaaaay better songwriter than performer. The best versions of his songs are those that are done by other people.
Bruce is on my list for Bands/Artists You Need To See As Soon As They Can Safely Tour Again.

This is going to be a brutal decade for losing legendary musicians and recording artists. Neal Peart and Eddie Van Halen were only the tip of the iceberg.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
This is going to be a brutal decade for losing legendary musicians and recording artists. Neal Peart and Eddie Van Halen were only the tip of the iceberg.
Yep. Pretty much any band member from the best classic rock bands has a greater them 75% chance of dying off before 2030. It’s going to become a monthly occurrence.

But...like they say in Atlantic City...

“Everything dies, baby that’s a fact,
but baby everything that dies someday comes back...”

:)
 

okeefe4prez

Well-Known Member
Ok, time to liven up a moribund thread. I was listening to "Can't Get There From Here" by REM today. As Georgia residents, they name dropped the town of Philomath, Georgia into the lyrics.

First of all, does anyone besides @okeefe4prez know where Philomath is? According to REM's Michael Stipe it's near Lexington near the South Carolina border. So I got to thinking, what US city is name dropped more than any other in popular music? My money is on New Orleans.

Also heard "The Zoo" by The Scorpions. Here's another question. Is there a better example out there of a band's best song being on one of it's shittiest albums? Animal Magnetism is a serious letdown after Taken By Force, Tokyo Tapes, and Lovedrive and has an offensive sexist album cover to boot. But that song just rocks and that riff is one of the most recognized in heavy metal.

Maybe "Kings And Queens" by Aerosmith off the lackluster Draw The Line. Any other examples?
I had only heard of it from Civil War history. Never been, never going. If the guy wants people to know where it is, he should say it's near Athens, not Lexington. There are four towns in Georgia everyone knows, Athens, Atlanta, Savannah and Augusta.

Speaking of Georgia, I'm trying to get tickets to the UGA-Clemson football game in Charlotte. That is one of the most compelling early season football games in years.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Today marks an anniversary. A sad one. On this day in 1980 Joy Division singer Ian Curtis hung himself at his home on the eve of what would have been their first American tour. Curtis had epilepsy and would occasionally have seizures on stage, which were only exacerbated by drum beats and stage lights. His "fly dance" onstage was one of the most famous sights of his era, but was criticized by some as epilepsy drama. Combined with substance abuse, depression, his medical issues led to early doom.

As for his band, it would be difficult to find another who has influenced more genres of music. (Perhaps Kraftwerk comes close)That high end bass that Peter Hook perfected was nicked by every indie and modern alternative rock band that succeeded them, such as Sonic Youth. Bands like Echo & The Bunnymen, U2, Adam Ant, Midnight Oil and INXS wouldn't exist without them, nor would the mope rock of the Cure, the Church, Depeche Mode, Nick Cave and Morrisey. That "dance floor" sound that was perfected by Duran Duran, Wang Chung, Pet Shop Boys, George Michael and about 7,861 synth pop bands owe loads of debt to Joy Division. Industrial bands like Ministry, Big Black and Nine Inch Nails? Hugely influenced by Curtis, as well as by their rhythmic drum cadences. Radiohead? Not a fucking chance without Joy Division. I could go on and on for hours.

Like Pearl Jam rising from the ashes of Mother Love Bone and the Andrew Wood tragedy, surviving Joy Division members Hook, Gordon Sumner, and Steve Morris added a keyboard player and continued on as New Order. Few bands have shook up the music world to the magnitude they did. RiP Ian on the anniversary of his death.
 
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hawkdrummer1

Well-Known Member
Sad to hear of anyone taking their life out of pain and distress. Curtis' story is a sad and interesting one.

That said...you may be going a bit over the top on Joy Division musically speaking IMHO
 

HawkeyeDug

Well-Known Member
Today marks an anniversary. A sad one. On this day in 1980 Joy Division singer Ian Curtis hung himself at his home on the eve of what would have been their first American tour. Curtis had epilepsy and would occasionally have seizures on stage, which were only exacerbated by drum beats and stage lights. His "fly dance" onstage was one of the most famous sights of his era, but was criticized by some as epilepsy drama. Combined with substance abuse, depression, his medical issues led to early doom.

As for his band, it would be difficult to find another who has influenced more genres of music. (Perhaps Kraftwerk comes close)That high end bass that Peter Hook perfected was nicked by every indie and modern alternative rock band that succeeded them, such as Sonic Youth. Echo & The Bunnymen, U2, Midnight Oil and INXS wouldn't exist without them, nor would the mope rock of the Cure, the Church, Depeche Mode, Nick Cave and Morrisey. That "dance floor" sound that was perfected by Duran Duran, Wang Chung, Pet Shop Boys, George Michael and about 7,861 synth pop bands owe loads of debt to Joy Division. Industrial bands like Ministry, Big Black and Nine Inch Nails? Hugely influenced by Curtis, as well as by their rhythmic drum cadences. Radiohead? Not a fucking chance without Joy Division. I could go on and on for hours.

Like Pearl Jam rising from the ashes of Mother Love Bone and the Andrew Wood tragedy, surviving Joy Division members Hook, Gordon Sumner, and Steve Morris added a keyboard player and continued on as New Order. Few bands have shook up the music world to the magnitude they did. RiP Ian on the anniversary of his death.
Also on the same date four years ago was Chris Cornell's death.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Sad to hear of anyone taking their life out of pain and distress. Curtis' story is a sad and interesting one.

That said...you may be going a bit over the top on Joy Division musically speaking IMHO
Respectfully noted, but don't confuse relative lack of commercial success with breadth of influence. Listen to what people like Bono and Thom Yorke have to say about Ian and Joy Division.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Also on the same date four years ago was Chris Cornell's death.
Also by hanging. He was close friends with Mother Love Bone's Andrew Wood and there are some who claim he never got over Andrew's heroin overdose.

If there is a Mount Rushmore of rock and roll vocalists Chris in on it.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
On a happier note Bob Mould has announced some fall tour dates. In addition to his usual Minneapolis and Chicago stops he will be in Stougjton Wisconsin with his band on October 16 and in Iowa City at the Englert on October 24 with a "solo electric show".

Bob is one of the absolute lynchpins of American alternative rock. And he usually leaves time in his shows for some Husker Du songs. Well worth checking out.
 
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