Music Thread

Seth53

Well-Known Member

A very under-rated band. They were part of the 2nd British invasion, spurred on by music videos (MTV).

They came up against Tear For Fears, Duran Duran, Flock of Seaguls, Human League, to name a few, so they were never a mega-hit band.

"Voices of Babylon" is worth a listen.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member

A very under-rated band. They were part of the 2nd British invasion, spurred on by music videos (MTV).

They came up against Tear For Fears, Duran Duran, Flock of Seaguls, Human League, to name a few, so they were never a mega-hit band.

"Voices of Babylon" is worth a listen.
They also drew comparisons to The Police, particularly the Sting-like vocal inflections of (RIP) Tony Lewis.

Not quite seeing any second wave of British invasion. Maybe Tears For Fears. They were more like Aussie bands of that era like INXS and Midnight Oil.
 

hawkdrummer1

Well-Known Member
Always have had a soft spot in my heart for this one.....

Jack was right about this too...

 

#1DieHardHawk

Well-Known Member
After all these years, I'm seriously contemplating getting back into vinyl. In the process, I've been investigating options for the system and am astounded at the options (and the potential costs...). Anyone here currently in that audiophile cult? Looking for some experienced advice. Thanks in advance.
 

NCHawker

Well-Known Member
After all these years, I'm seriously contemplating getting back into vinyl. In the process, I've been investigating options for the system and am astounded at the options (and the potential costs...). Anyone here currently in that audiophile cult? Looking for some experienced advice. Thanks in advance.

I do audio editing with my voice over endeavors. The sound engineers that I've talked to explained that the range of highs and lows that you can hear when listening to Vinyl is greater than with an .mp3 file. To illustrate, He held up an 8 1/2 X11 piece of paper with a lot of text and then held up a very small sticky note. And said if you had to compress all of this information and put it into the small space you're going to lose something. And so it is when music is transported into an .mp3. There are other digital file format (like .wav and others) that allow for greater detail and sound quality, mp3 is the generally accepted rough and ready.

I've always wondered when you see a youtube music video and it says (HD) if that means it was uploaded with a larger file type like .wav ... don't know but wondering.

So going to Vinyl can get you some very nice sound quality...if you're into it and have the equipment to hear it all.
 

#1DieHardHawk

Well-Known Member
I do audio editing with my voice over endeavors. The sound engineers that I've talked to explained that the range of highs and lows that you can hear when listening to Vinyl is greater than with an .mp3 file. To illustrate, He held up an 8 1/2 X11 piece of paper with a lot of text and then held up a very small sticky note. And said if you had to compress all of this information and put it into the small space you're going to lose something. And so it is when music is transported into an .mp3. There are other digital file format (like .wav and others) that allow for greater detail and sound quality, mp3 is the generally accepted rough and ready.

I've always wondered when you see a youtube music video and it says (HD) if that means it was uploaded with a larger file type like .wav ... don't know but wondering.

So going to Vinyl can get you some very nice sound quality...if you're into it and have the equipment to hear it all.
Clean vinyl is still the king. Compressed files don't even come close if you have the right system.

SACD and high-res audio do come close. SACD options are limited/restricted, though. I think it's a copyright thing (Sony?). High-res audio probably is the future but a good DAC is a must. I'm still going to focus on rebuilding my vinyl system and collection. Should be fun as long as I don't suffer sticker-shock. The system options alone are making my head spin and the cost investment can get out of control in a hurry.
 

Grady

Well-Known Member
After all these years, I'm seriously contemplating getting back into vinyl. In the process, I've been investigating options for the system and am astounded at the options (and the potential costs...). Anyone here currently in that audiophile cult? Looking for some experienced advice. Thanks in advance.
Don't sweat it. 10 years ago or so I decided to get a turntable so I could start enjoying my modest vinyl collection dating back to the '60s. Bought a good quality Pro-Ject turntable & needle, got a couple speakers in the $2-300 range (which were the cheapest speakers I've ever bought), and power them through my 37 year old Onkyo receiver/amp with a built-in ground. Sounds damn good to me -- for under $1,000 since I already had the receiver/amp. I started having an annual 'Vinyl Revival Party' at our house where only albums are played and everyone is invited to bring their own vinyl...they bring it, we play it! It's turned into the most anticipated party of the year with an unlimited potluck of food, booze, a 'dance segment', vintage clothing outfits, etc. I thought people might bring 1 or 2 albums, and the first year people started showing up with literally bags and bags full of vinyl! Our last party a friend brought a portable unit that plays just 45 rpm discs and we hooked that up so we could listen to some old Elvis! Just do it.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
My wifey bought me a turntable for Christmas about a year and a half ago. Not only were many of my 70's and 80's albums still in good shape, I've picked up some more vinyls since then. Mad City Records in Madison is an excellent place and Iowa City has a couple as well.
 

Grady

Well-Known Member
My wifey bought me a turntable for Christmas about a year and a half ago. Not only were many of my 70's and 80's albums still in good shape, I've picked up some more vinyls since then. Mad City Records in Madison is an excellent place and Iowa City has a couple as well.
I typically pick up a couple albums a year, which is starting to drive MY wife crazy -- she thinks I have enough vinyl! Stumbled across a great vinyl shop in downtown Boulder last October when visiting -- a nice combo of old and new.
 

#1DieHardHawk

Well-Known Member
Don't sweat it. 10 years ago or so I decided to get a turntable so I could start enjoying my modest vinyl collection dating back to the '60s. Bought a good quality Pro-Ject turntable & needle, got a couple speakers in the $2-300 range (which were the cheapest speakers I've ever bought), and power them through my 37 year old Onkyo receiver/amp with a built-in ground. Sounds damn good to me -- for under $1,000 since I already had the receiver/amp. I started having an annual 'Vinyl Revival Party' at our house where only albums are played and everyone is invited to bring their own vinyl...they bring it, we play it! It's turned into the most anticipated party of the year with an unlimited potluck of food, booze, a 'dance segment', vintage clothing outfits, etc. I thought people might bring 1 or 2 albums, and the first year people started showing up with literally bags and bags full of vinyl! Our last party a friend brought a portable unit that plays just 45 rpm discs and we hooked that up so we could listen to some old Elvis! Just do it.
That's some good stuff. I'll have to consider something similar. I gave away what I left of albums years ago. My favorites were all pretty banged up anyway from a lot of overuse. I'm looking forward to restocking it.

I'll be picking up a good quality CD player as well. Some of the later stuff I like to listen to likely isn't available in vinyl (plus the higher quality CD players frequently have better built-in DACs that allow for high-resolution audio choices).
 

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