Vaccine rollout

lazyhawkfan

Well-Known Member
Random thought (meaning I have no background in virology or vaccination distribution and really haven't researched it).

Because our targeted approach is resulting in a snails paced rollout, why not start giving them to people most likely to partake in behavior likely to spread covid? There are almost 20 million University students. Send vaccines to the universities and vaccinate the staff and students. Here's the kicker, in order to get into the local bars you need to show you've been vaccinated. Then send additional vaccines to public schools (high schools and elementary) the school nurse could administer to the faculty, students(there are about 56 million public school students) and family members. I am in no way saying to stop with nursing homes and hospitals, rather saying to do this in addition. Just seems like this would be an effective way to reach a lot of people very quickly since what we are doing isn't working. That would like likely get you close to if not past the 100 million in 100 days Biden is promising. Then it would be if we can procure enough.
Just a thought
 

Ree4

Well-Known Member
Random thought (meaning I have no background in virology or vaccination distribution and really haven't researched it).

Because our targeted approach is resulting in a snails paced rollout, why not start giving them to people most likely to partake in behavior likely to spread covid? There are almost 20 million University students. Send vaccines to the universities and vaccinate the staff and students. Here's the kicker, in order to get into the local bars you need to show you've been vaccinated. Then send additional vaccines to public schools (high schools and elementary) the school nurse could administer to the faculty, students(there are about 56 million public school students) and family members. I am in no way saying to stop with nursing homes and hospitals, rather saying to do this in addition. Just seems like this would be an effective way to reach a lot of people very quickly since what we are doing isn't working. That would like likely get you close to if not past the 100 million in 100 days Biden is promising. Then it would be if we can procure enough.
Just a thought
I think that's an interesting suggestion and would be an effective one, but it also rewards those who likely being the most irresponsible. Many of the uneducated people that are against masks are also against vaccines since they don't believe in science, so I think it might be tough to convince them. College students though, I could see that being a decent option.
 

kicker22

Well-Known Member
Because I'm a teacher, I already got mine. Too bad. Was looking forward to a couple of weeks off. ;)

Glad you mentioned this and good for you. What I can't figure out is how this is being distributed. I work in the community service field and was advised in mid December that we'd be in the "second group to get their vaccines" and would most likely get our first dose around the end of January. I then heard last night (not sure if true or not) that local HyVee pharmacies were going to start (or had already started) distributing to the general public already. Which made me question why I'm waiting to get it through my employer when I could probably get it sooner from a different source.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
I live an hour and a half from Sioux Falls which is the home base for Sanford health. They have a website where you can put your name on a waiting list which is what I did. I figure I'm not high-risk, and I'm terrible about paying attention to when/how/where it's my group's time for availability. This way I'll just get an email someday telling me I can go get it.

As an aside, it may happen sooner than that because my employer is in one of the "essential" manufacturer sectors.
 

Scott Leclair

Well-Known Member
Random thought (meaning I have no background in virology or vaccination distribution and really haven't researched it).

Because our targeted approach is resulting in a snails paced rollout, why not start giving them to people most likely to partake in behavior likely to spread covid? There are almost 20 million University students. Send vaccines to the universities and vaccinate the staff and students. Here's the kicker, in order to get into the local bars you need to show you've been vaccinated. Then send additional vaccines to public schools (high schools and elementary) the school nurse could administer to the faculty, students(there are about 56 million public school students) and family members. I am in no way saying to stop with nursing homes and hospitals, rather saying to do this in addition. Just seems like this would be an effective way to reach a lot of people very quickly since what we are doing isn't working. That would like likely get you close to if not past the 100 million in 100 days Biden is promising. Then it would be if we can procure enough.
Just a thought
kids under the age of 16 and or 18 cannot get the vaccine yet. It will be sometime as scientist have not studied what the vaccine does to kids under 16/18.
 

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kicker22

Well-Known Member
I live an hour and a half from Sioux Falls which is the home base for Sanford health. They have a website where you can put your name on a waiting list which is what I did. I figure I'm not high-risk, and I'm terrible about paying attention to when/how/where it's my group's time for availability. This way I'll just get an email someday telling me I can go get it.

As an aside, it may happen sooner than that because my employer is in one of the "essential" manufacturer sectors.

Any luck with this? I work for the county in the community services field and in my line of work its been essentially determined that despite being an essential employee that works directly with the public, there is essentially no rush to get us vaccinated.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
Any luck with this? I work for the county in the community services field and in my line of work its been essentially determined that despite being an essential employee that works directly with the public, there is essentially no rush to get us vaccinated.
I haven't actually pushed it, I've just been waiting until my turn comes up. Might be different if I had called to try and get the shot but I haven't. I'm 40 and not in any of the risk groups so I thought I'd just wait until Sanford told me I was on deck, or it got to the point where my demographic group was opened up across the board.
 

MattinColumbus

Well-Known Member
It’s pretty slow here in Ohio as well. we were supposed to have groups 1a (65+ and first responders) and 1b (medical conditions) done early this month. We’re still in 1b. I turn 62 next week, so our age group is up next in theory. According to state data, ages 60 and over account for something over 90% of the deaths here. My daughter signed my wife and I up at a couple places over the weekend since we hadn’t done it ourselves (nice to have a responsible kid).

Our governor’s twitter account gives updates on this almost daily, and it’s kind of funny to see bartenders and servers - most of whom are in low risk age groups - complaining that they’re not next.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
It’s pretty slow here in Ohio as well. we were supposed to have groups 1a (65+ and first responders) and 1b (medical conditions) done early this month. We’re still in 1b. I turn 62 next week, so our age group is up next in theory. According to state data, ages 60 and over account for something over 90% of the deaths here. My daughter signed my wife and I up at a couple places over the weekend since we hadn’t done it ourselves (nice to have a responsible kid).

Our governor’s twitter account gives updates on this almost daily, and it’s kind of funny to see bartenders and servers - most of whom are in low risk age groups - complaining that they’re not next.
Where I live I'd anecdotally say more people will refuse it than take it. At least most people I talk to say they won't get it.

My best friend is 38 years old, 400 lbs and diabetic. Because of his weight/diabetes issues his doctor recommended the flu shot last season (pre covid) so he got it. About 3 days later he got the flu, which can happen. He was 104 fever and ended up w/ pneumonia and a couple days in the hospital, and ever since then he's adamantly against the flu shot and says no way is he taking the covid one.

He is 100% not a conspiracy theory weirdo or an anti vaxxer in the usual sense of that word (his kids are vaxxed, etc.), but he has it set in his mind that no way is he gonna touch it with a 10' pole. I kinda wish he'd get it since he's pretty high risk but I don't say anything because I know he won't change his mind anyway. Sometimes you gotta just let some shit go in the interest of relationships.
 

MattinColumbus

Well-Known Member
Yeah, my wife is always hassling me about a flu shot, and I’ve gotten one the past 3 years. This year, she caught the flu even though she had the shot. Coughed and wheezed all over the house and me for 2 weeks.

I didn’t get it.

I think we’ve both had the OG Covid. We were on a cruise ship a year ago and the 2nd to last day my wife got pretty sick......fever, really bad cough, etc. After we got home we found out that a number of people on the ship tested positive when they got home. Of course, the cruise line didn’t notify us. I had a mild fever and light cough that lasted 3 days.

But we’ve probably used up any immunity now, and with the new mutations we could get sick again, I suppose. In any case, the day I can get the vaccine is the day I’ll get it. And we need more than half of people to get it, too.

Oh, and your friend understands that 1) you don’t get the flu from a flu shot, and 2) it takes around 2 weeks for the vaccine to be effective, right? If he got it 3 days later, the vaccine wasn’t protecting him.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
Oh, and your friend understands that 1) you don’t get the flu from a flu shot, and 2) it takes around 2 weeks for the vaccine to be effective, right? If he got it 3 days later, the vaccine wasn’t protecting him.
Yep. I know it makes the guy seem like a whack job but he's really not. One of the most normal, level-headed people I know.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
I think we’ve both had the OG Covid. We were on a cruise ship a year ago and the 2nd to last day my wife got pretty sick......fever, really bad cough, etc. After we got home we found out that a number of people on the ship tested positive when they got home. Of course, the cruise line didn’t notify us. I had a mild fever and light cough that lasted 3 days.
This is probably impossible, but I wonder if I somehow had it late Feb/early March which was before it was even on the news as being in the US.

My son had a really bad infection in his hip and was in the hospital for a week in Sioux Falls for surgery, and about the second day we were there I started to feel like shit. Had a cough and a mild fever for about 4 days, and for about the next 2 weeks I couldn't hardly walk without getting winded, and even after the cough was gone I had fluid in my throat all the time. Felt like I had to clear my throat 24 hours a day. I was just completely wiped out that whole time.

Maybe I just got a really bad chest cold, who knows. I wrote off the possibility early on because it didn't really start showing up in the US until a week or 2 later, but lately I've seen some credible studies suggesting it's likely that covid was here earlier than we thought. I was never concerned enough to get an antibody test, and even if I got one now and it was positive I could have contracted it any time within the past year. This thing is weird though, I've got an uncle with congestive heart failure and COPD, he went in for a scheduled heart procedure and tested positive and he never had a single symptom. Got another test to confirm and it was positive as well. I said right from the start that he'd be dead if he got it, but he was totally fine and never would have known. And then we have a lady at work who still can't taste or smell since she got it back in May.
 

PCHawk

Well-Known Member
My wife and 2 of my kids tested positive but hardly had symptoms. Wife couldn't taste or smell for a few days is all. Me and my other 2 kids tested negative. I went in a week later and got another test and an antibody test and both were negative again. Slept in the same bed the whole time. Wife went in for an antibody test a couple months later and was already negative. Was the first test wrong? The antibody test wrong? Her antibodies gone that fast? Why didn't I get it? Why didn't my other kids get it? So many questions.
 

MattinColumbus

Well-Known Member
As I said earlier, I’m almost 62. Wife is the same age. We’ve taken calculated risks over the past year. We see our daughter, son in law and the grandkids every week. But that’s about it. We don’t go out to eat. We don’t socialize with big groups. We’ve gone to my grandson’s soccer games, but those are outside, and each family group stays distanced. My daughter and her family are careful, too (she’s had her first shot because she’s an OT for the local school district).

I think it’s all about the risks you’re willing to accept. We don’t take big risks (at least to us), but we’re not going to totally isolate ourselves.

My daughter’s in-laws are the biggest risk. They’re on the end of the political spectrum where they think Covid is a hoax. And we’ve had a couple scares there In terms of my daughter potentially being exposed, but so far, so good. Would be my luck to catch it just before I get scheduled to be vaccinated.
 

MattinColumbus

Well-Known Member
This is probably impossible, but I wonder if I somehow had it late Feb/early March which was before it was even on the news as being in the US.

My son had a really bad infection in his hip and was in the hospital for a week in Sioux Falls for surgery, and about the second day we were there I started to feel like shit. Had a cough and a mild fever for about 4 days, and for about the next 2 weeks I couldn't hardly walk without getting winded, and even after the cough was gone I had fluid in my throat all the time. Felt like I had to clear my throat 24 hours a day. I was just completely wiped out that whole time.

Maybe I just got a really bad chest cold, who knows. I wrote off the possibility early on because it didn't really start showing up in the US until a week or 2 later, but lately I've seen some credible studies suggesting it's likely that covid was here earlier than we thought. I was never concerned enough to get an antibody test, and even if I got one now and it was positive I could have contracted it any time within the past year. This thing is weird though, I've got an uncle with congestive heart failure and COPD, he went in for a scheduled heart procedure and tested positive and he never had a single symptom. Got another test to confirm and it was positive as well. I said right from the start that he'd be dead if he got it, but he was totally fine and never would have known. And then we have a lady at work who still can't taste or smell since she got it back in May.
I don’t thinks that’s impossible at all.....improbable, but not impossible. Just depends on who you were around, and who they were around, and so on.
 

PCHawk

Well-Known Member
As I said earlier, I’m almost 62. Wife is the same age. We’ve taken calculated risks over the past year. We see our daughter, son in law and the grandkids every week. But that’s about it. We don’t go out to eat. We don’t socialize with big groups. We’ve gone to my grandson’s soccer games, but those are outside, and each family group stays distanced. My daughter and her family are careful, too (she’s had her first shot because she’s an OT for the local school district).

I think it’s all about the risks you’re willing to accept. We don’t take big risks (at least to us), but we’re not going to totally isolate ourselves.

My daughter’s in-laws are the biggest risk. They’re on the end of the political spectrum where they think Covid is a hoax. And we’ve had a couple scares there In terms of my daughter potentially being exposed, but so far, so good. Would be my luck to catch it just before I get scheduled to be vaccinated.
I completely get the people who don't take any risks at all condemning others. What I find funny are the people who take the risks that think are worth it condemning others for taking the risks that they think are worth it. It's just a bunch of people judging each other for the risks they are willing to take.

This isn't directed at you. Just a general observation.
 

Luftgekuehlt67

Well-Known Member
I completely get the people who don't take any risks at all condemning others. What I find funny are the people who take the risks that think are worth it condemning others for taking the risks that they think are worth it. It's just a bunch of people judging each other for the risks they are willing to take.

This isn't directed at you. Just a general observation.
That is so spot on. I said this a long time ago, the % of people who are *really* avoiding risk/exposure is really small. The majority of people I think fall between "no precautions" and "some precautions". And, based on the people I know, it's across the political spectrum...the only difference I have seen political persuasion making is in terms of the stories we tell ourselves/others. Right leaning acquaintances tend to be more on the "government can't tell me what to do", "it's overblown", etc side of things. Left leaning acquaintances are more likely to make pseudo-scientific as well as emotional appeals - "we wiped everything down before we sat down to eat", "my mom has been very lonely since my dad passed away", etc.

Ultimately, the life lesson I have taken away: people's desire to live their lives is strong. That's not a red/blue thing, that's a people thing. Two hypothetical people - one red, one blue - woke up this morning and, insert your scenario here...wanted to go to the mall to buy new shoes, wanted to go out to lunch with a friend, wanted their kid to have a play date, whatever. They had *something* that was important to them they wanted to do. That's where the storytelling starts. Both people likely end up walking into the mall today...they both ultimately made the same risk/reward calculation but told themselves *wildly* different things getting to their respective answers. "Damned government can't stop me from doing what I want to do" vs "isn't it amazing how we've all come together to safely adjust to this new reality?!?". Under it all, both people just wanted new Nikes and were willing to take what they rationalized as "a little risk" to get them.
 
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