The winning TD throw in the Natty Champ. game

uihawk82

Well-Known Member
I did not have a frames per second replay on that play or a stop watch but just a good estimate with the game clock and also internal timing tells me that Stetson the IVth released that ball at 3 seconds if not a couple tenths less than that. The reason I mention this is many fans do not think we have the pass blocking to throw it deep for than once or twice a game. They think we need 4 to 5 seconds but Stetson read his receiver beating the defender after 20 yards down the field, just over 2 seconds.

I disagree and if the hawk running game is better next year and play action can slightly hold the pass rush back I think it is time to look for some deeper targets; back to the TEnds 25 yards or so down the hashes, deep throws to the wideouts down the sidelines, and some deep combo routes of a post pattern and and deep out.

I hope the QBs and receivers get to work on their timing a lot together on their own like it seemed CJB and Vandeberg maybe did.
 

JoeyLabasForPresident

Well-Known Member
I did not have a frames per second replay on that play or a stop watch but just a good estimate with the game clock and also internal timing tells me that Stetson the IVth released that ball at 3 seconds if not a couple tenths less than that. The reason I mention this is many fans do not think we have the pass blocking to throw it deep for than once or twice a game. They think we need 4 to 5 seconds but Stetson read his receiver beating the defender after 20 yards down the field, just over 2 seconds.

I disagree and if the hawk running game is better next year and play action can slightly hold the pass rush back I think it is time to look for some deeper targets; back to the TEnds 25 yards or so down the hashes, deep throws to the wideouts down the sidelines, and some deep combo routes of a post pattern and and deep out.

I hope the QBs and receivers get to work on their timing a lot together on their own like it seemed CJB and Vandeberg maybe did.
Well that's the difference, isn't it? And you see it at all levels of play. Receivers that can consistently beat their coverage are the ultimate safety blanket for a quarterback. Tom Brady was already a high caliber quarterback and having Randy Moss took him from a great quarterback to what was the greatest season a QB has ever had. We aren't generally getting those at Iowa unless we happen to have an excellent guy in state (Which we might have on the roster now, time will tell) or we develop them. That can be done. You might take a look at the school that Moss guy played at. There are plenty of great receivers in the NFL that didn't play at blue bloods. Some that didn't play the position in college, and there are even some that played different sports all together before becoming a UDFA.

I did find it really strange when we would go weeks at a time last season without seeing LaPorta get meaningful targets. Unless there was some injury we weren't aware of, I chalk that up to either QB play or play calling, but considering the fact that Petras almost always goes to his first read, I'm going to say it was probably more so the latter.
 
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uihawk82

Well-Known Member
I did find it really strange when we would go weeks at a time last season without seeing LaPorta get meaningful targets. Unless there was some injury we weren't aware of, I chalk that up to either QB play or play calling, but considering the fact that Petras almost always goes to his first read, I'm going to say it was probably more so the latter.

And maybe Laporta was double teamed and sandwiched a lot in zone coverage by many teams since he was a top receiver, main target, and someone who gets first downs. We would have to look at a lot of video.

All I know is I love to watch replays of that screen to Laporta for the td against Kentucky and watch him accel down the field behind those blockers. That was a perfectly executed play from the wide receiver routes mostly going to the right, Laporta blocking for 2 counts, etc, etc.
 

HuckFinn

Well-Known Member
My observation would be that successful QB’s throw a lot of 50/50 balls deep. When I watch receivers catch those passes, I am flabbergasted by their concentration and athleticism. Long passes are, even for AR in GB, a relatively low % pass. We rarely attempt these throws. Maybe our problem is the receivers. Maybe it’s our QB’s. Or, both.
 
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