HAMMERING HANK

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Aaron past away today. In my mind, he is the home run king. The roid king, Barry Bonds, doesn't count!
Aaron was a hell of a player, and a better humanitarian. And I can proudly say I got to see him at Wrigley in 1974.

I wonder, however, how many home runs Willie Mays would have hit had he played in better hitter's parks and not missed nearly two seasons serving in Korea. Ted Williams lost FIVE seasons to military service.

I have no doubt Aaron would also have served his country had it been necessary. He just happened to start a few years after May's.

He deserves the record, not only because of the crap he dealt with but because of his amazing consistency. Mantle probably had five seasons better than Aaron's best. But Aaron was consistent over the long haul.

Aaron also got to "sneak up" on the record, so to speak. He trailed Mantle and Mays much of the sixties. It wasn't until he hit 47 home runs in 1971 to get over 600 that people started to take his chase seriously.
 

BILLYBOBSTEXAS

Well-Known Member
Hank was a great baseball player as well as a great person. One thing that sticks in my craw is how the powers that be want steroid users like Bonds and Clemons inducted in the hall of fame but not Pete Rose. I get what he did was wrong but his numbers are undeniable. He did it without drugs.
 

Northside Hawk

Well-Known Member
Hank was a great baseball player as well as a great person. One thing that sticks in my craw is how the powers that be want steroid users like Bonds and Clemons inducted in the hall of fame but not Pete Rose. I get what he did was wrong but his numbers are undeniable. He did it without drugs.
Hank had tremendous hand and wrist action in his swing. It created a tremendous backspin on the ball as if left his bat. Balls that would have only carried to the warning track for others managed to sneak over the fence for Hank.

He was a tremendous all around hitter as well. He is third in all time hits to Rose and Cobb. He used the whole field. His strikeouts were low for a power hitter and he also had good wheels for much of his career.
 

99topdawg

Well-Known Member
Hank had tremendous hand and wrist action in his swing. It created a tremendous backspin on the ball as if left his bat. Balls that would have only carried to the warning track for others managed to sneak over the fence for Hank.

He was a tremendous all around hitter as well. He is third in all time hits to Rose and Cobb. He used the whole field. His strikeouts were low for a power hitter and he also had good wheels for much of his career.
He attributed his hand and wrist strength to the fact that he hit cross-handed (left hand on top) until 1952, two years before he made the major league.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
He attributed his hand and wrist strength to the fact that he hit cross-handed (left hand on top) until 1952, two years before he made the major league.
My old man's league partner used to golf like that. He's long dead now, but even in his sixties that guy could absolutely RIP a golf ball. The only problem was that when he hooked it it could end up four holes over.
 

vork22

Well-Known Member
My old man's league partner used to golf like that. He's long dead now, but even in his sixties that guy could absolutely RIP a golf ball. The only problem was that when he hooked it it could end up four holes over.
Have you ever tried cross handed it’s nearly impossible? I don’t understand how anyone does it. I met Aaron as a boy and he shook my hand and gave me an autograph. His hands were like bear paws.
 

99topdawg

Well-Known Member
Have you ever tried cross handed it’s nearly impossible? I don’t understand how anyone does it. I met Aaron as a boy and he shook my hand and gave me an autograph. His hands were like bear paws.
I suppose it's like writing left-handed. I have a ton of people ask me how I can do it. Still though, it seems like hitting cross-handed would make your wrists roll over too soon.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
I suppose it's like writing left-handed. I have a ton of people ask me how I can do it. Still though, it seems like hitting cross-handed would make your wrists roll over too soon.
With a baseball bat in a normal grip there isn't really any cranking your wrist backwards (like your wrist would be in a push up position).

With a cross-handed grip it seems to me like you'd at some point have to pull harder than hell to snap your left hand across (for a righty). I can't see that being good for your wrist at all. I'll try it with a fungo Sunday and see what it feels like. Maybe try to hit a ball off a tee.
 

uihawk82

Well-Known Member
Aaron was a hell of a player, and a better humanitarian. And I can proudly say I got to see him at Wrigley in 1974.

I wonder, however, how many home runs Willie Mays would have hit had he played in better hitter's parks and not missed nearly two seasons serving in Korea. Ted Williams lost FIVE seasons to military service.

I have no doubt Aaron would also have served his country had it been necessary. He just happened to start a few years after May's.

He deserves the record, not only because of the crap he dealt with but because of his amazing consistency. Mantle probably had five seasons better than Aaron's best. But Aaron was consistent over the long haul.

Aaron also got to "sneak up" on the record, so to speak. He trailed Mantle and Mays much of the sixties. It wasn't until he hit 47 home runs in 1971 to get over 600 that people started to take his chase seriously.

My mom's dad lived in Milwaukee and when we visited my mom and dad took us to a Braves game around 1958. I knew a little about baseball at 7 years of age but didnt know the players much. I also didnt know they played an in season exhibition game that nite against the traveling NY Yankees. The yanks and braves played against each other iirc twice in the late '50s.

I sort of knew who mickey mantle and yogi berra were but there were so many great players on both teams that night. I also saw Aaron in a daylight double header at wrigley around 1968-69. Aaron hit two dingers that day and iirc I think the baby bull orlando cepeda had been traded to the braves and he hit a couple.

Great times going with a couple friends and one of their parents.
 

uihawk82

Well-Known Member
Hank was a great baseball player as well as a great person. One thing that sticks in my craw is how the powers that be want steroid users like Bonds and Clemons inducted in the hall of fame but not Pete Rose. I get what he did was wrong but his numbers are undeniable. He did it without drugs.

And Rose paid the price over the years but Rose also wouldnt admit the betting for a long time which was his mistake. You own it and do good and people will come around.
 
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