Game experience in the stadium

Grady

Well-Known Member
Yes, Gary and Kirk still hold hands.

All kidding aside, being there is a whole different experience. When your at the game you can much more feel the momentum of the game more so than on TV. This is especially true for the defense. You can just tell if the defense is manhandling the offense as you can see the whole field. You can see if receivers are well covered and not getting open. You can see the penetration into the backfield. You see all of these things all at once.

Then there is the energy you feel from the crowd and how that energy erupts on a big play.

Now having said that I can only imagine how hard it’s been this year for those who have been at the games and had to watch our struggling offense. Big plays are really exciting as you can see the plays developing. This slow methodical play calling is ok and you get clapping afterwards but it’s not the same excitement and energy you get on a big play.

That’s why you have to appreciate the defense as that is where most of the energy is. The pick six’s by our defense is an eruption. The offensive philosophy is a yawner. Even when they are moving the ball systematically it’s just not the same energy and excitement.
One thing I've noticed the past couple years is how much more difficult it is to watch Iowa on TV than in person. I have season tickets so try to get to every home game, health willing. While it's indeed frustrating to watch the offense in person, you at least have the pre-game tailgating, people watching, band, wave, friends seated next to you, and the communal/tribal experience of it all. Conversely, I was on vacation in Colorado last year and watched the Wisconsin game on TV alone and it was one of the more depressing 3 hours of the entire year.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
Yes, Gary and Kirk still hold hands.

All kidding aside, being there is a whole different experience. When your at the game you can much more feel the momentum of the game more so than on TV. This is especially true for the defense. You can just tell if the defense is manhandling the offense as you can see the whole field. You can see if receivers are well covered and not getting open. You can see the penetration into the backfield. You see all of these things all at once.

Then there is the energy you feel from the crowd and how that energy erupts on a big play.

Now having said that I can only imagine how hard it’s been this year for those who have been at the games and had to watch our struggling offense. Big plays are really exciting as you can see the plays developing. This slow methodical play calling is ok and you get clapping afterwards but it’s not the same excitement and energy you get on a big play.

That’s why you have to appreciate the defense as that is where most of the energy is. The pick six’s by our defense is an eruption. The offensive philosophy is a yawner. Even when they are moving the ball systematically it’s just not the same energy and excitement.
Watching Tory Taylor punt in person when you can see the entire field is more impressive than anything else out there, defense included. You can’t get a sense of the difficulty level of what he does by watching on TV. It’s unbelievable.

Taylor is a true generational talent.
 

dagdaj

Well-Known Member
Watching Tory Taylor punt in person when you can see the entire field is more impressive than anything else out there, defense included. You can’t get a sense of the difficulty level of what he does by watching on TV. It’s unbelievable.

Taylor is a true generational talent.

We got to our seats way early. Watching warmups was pretty entertaining. Just to see how they do it. I wouldn't do it regularly, but it was interesting to watch the whole orchestration of it. Watching Taylor was an absolute clinic. I went back through like 5 minutes of video I took of him on my phone. Punt after punt from varying distances.

The first one hit about a yard into the endzone and spun out the back of the endzone. I think that was the only one that crossed the goal line. The rest just hit at the 5, bounced up into the air and rolled to the 2. Or they bounced at the 1, bounced the other direction to the 4, then hit the ground and did this slow wobble back to the 2.

I do have to say the whole outside-the-stadium experience felt way less oppressive than it did in the early 90s when I graduated. Far less adversarial. Maybe 'cause I'm old the vibe people in uniforms/on golf carts/etc. gave off to me was just different than they would have had I been a 20-something.

But it felt way less oppressive. More like "I trust you not to be an ass. I'll come down on you if you are, but if you're not being an ass, there's no need for me to even give you the bent eye". Also, I didn't see any Two Stars walking up and down the student section with an armful of confiscated bota bags.
 
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Fryowa

Administrator
I do have to say the whole outside-the-stadium experience felt way less oppressive than it did in the early 90s when I graduated. Far less adversarial. Maybe 'cause I'm old the vibe people in uniforms/on golf carts/etc. gave off to me was just different than they would have had I been a 20-something.

But it felt way less oppressive. More like "I trust you not to be an ass. I'll come down on you if you are, but if you're not being an ass, there's no need for me to even give you the bent eye". Also, I didn't see any Two Stars walking up and down the student section with an armful of confiscated bota bags.
When they finally figured out that kiboshing open containers on gameday was 1) futile, and 2) counterproductive to their wallets and started letting people walk around with beers and cocktails freely again...they also figured out the balance between the Barney Fifes and Bert Kreischers.

I think it has to do also with a different generation of cops. Back in the day it was mostly older upper 40s early 50s cops looking for some overtime who didn't have anything better to do than try and bust all the college punks. Now that college football is so much more of an event and crowds are so much bigger it's pretty much all hands on deck and the cops tend to be younger and more lenient. Hell before the Nevada game my buddy and I talked to a sheriff's deputy on Melrose for probably 20 minutes and had a pretty cool conversation. Said buddy was double fisting Busch Lattes and drank 'em right there in front of the cop. Never a word was said and he never even got a sideways look.
 

dagdaj

Well-Known Member
Now that college football is so much more of an event and crowds are so much bigger it's pretty much all hands on deck and the cops tend to be younger and more lenient. Hell before the Nevada game my buddy and I talked to a sheriff's deputy on Melrose for probably 20 minutes and had a pretty cool conversation. Said buddy was double fisting Busch Lattes and drank 'em right there in front of the cop. Never a word was said and he never even got a sideways look.

All hands on deck....for sure.

I did notice just how many different county/state/many municipalities were providing law enforcement.
And I saw a lot of them mixed together. Like a state cop (some sort of trooper? without the hat?) with like an Iowa City cop, and then like another one from like West Branch or something. Maybe even like Anamosa??? I distinctly remember seeing a few rather far flung door decals on hand.

Mixing them up like that seems like a solid idea. Makes them all think twice about how they look to other agencies/departments. But it gives them access to lots of muscle if they need it.

What I have no gauge on is the scale and scope of it in relation to 30 years ago. I mean, it seemed big then. Melrose doesn't seem anything really different. Maybe a little more organized and slightly more 'commercial' with all the food tents, Kraus Plaza, clothing/trinket trucks, organized "Hawk Walk".

But, I never spent time in any of the lots and stuff. I had a friend who rented a second floor of one of those houses on Melrose, so....life was good for us tailgaiting wise. My gut's telling me that it's much more organized north and west along Melrose (which allows the University/Athletics to capitalize a bit more, I got no problem with that). But I sense more people are there before the game than in the past. And I'm even guessing more people come and participate without actually going to the game?
 

Chickenlounge

Well-Known Member
I like how they don't even pretend to pat you down anymore looking for booze. I walked in with 2 cans in my back pockets for the Nevada game and they didn't even bat an eye.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
I did notice just how many different county/state/many municipalities were providing law enforcement.
You'll see Iowa City cops, Marion cops, U of I cops, Johnson County Sheriff, State Patrol, among others.
But I sense more people are there before the game than in the past. And I'm even guessing more people come and participate without actually going to the game?
In our private lot (Myrtle area) we have 40-50 total spots and I'd guess that maybe 10 of them stay at the tailgate and don't go for the game. Most of them have satellites and have the game on TV. They get the best of both worlds. All the fun of hanging out and tailgating and the ease of seeing the game in HD. If I lived close to IC I might even do that from time to time. But we drive 5 1/2 hours every week so I'm not gonna do that and not go to the actual game.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
I like how they don't even pretend to pat you down anymore looking for booze. I walked in with 2 cans in my back pockets for the Nevada game and they didn't even bat an eye.
I never even get looked at. I have my ticket pulled up when I get to the first gate person and wave me right on to the ticket scanner dude.
 

dagdaj

Well-Known Member
This is now a doubly fascinating discussion. I just happened to finally click on this link and read the article. I'd seen a bit of video of Kiffin getting grouchy about "fan support" in response to a post-game question. I didn't watch the whole thing or bother to even see what it was about. I just now clicked and read this article.

Lane Kiffin's fan gripes bring up fair point: Is college football about the game or the party? (yahoo.com)

Didn't realize that attendance was dropping on the whole, but localized. I didn't realize that stuff like "Jump Around" are calculated moves. Well, even if they're organic, they're definitely being capitalized on. (Makes The Wave even more genuine and special). Being that "In Heaven There Is No Beer" predates the mechanical money machine era, I'm gonna call it genuine. I didn't realize that the "party decks" and such were coming to college football. I guess hot tubs and weird food concoctions like Krispy Kreme hamburgers are next? Dizzy bat races at halftime? No thank you.

I assume for Iowa, the alcohol sales were more about extra revenue than keeping butts in seats. Same would be true for any team no facing attendance issues. I know the Hawks wax and wane in attendance to a degree, depending on success. But it's within a margin explained by success, not changing attitudes.

My experience (albeit limited to two games in the last 4 years) is that Iowa does not have the problem. They might be worried about it? But they do not have the problem. A solid balance between game and party. The stuff they've added (stuff on the plaza, beer sales, etc) feel more like low-key additions. They haven't had to pull stunts. I imagine, as the article states, it's isolated to the smaller schools. I hope Iowa never has to worry about it. I just don't see it in the short term.

I firmly believe that my experiences as a non-student attending the event was probably far better than it would have been 30 years ago as a non-student. Only because there's more portapotties. More places to get a bite or a shirt or a drink of water. All without feeling like it's been commercialized. So far, I'd have to say those in charge at Iowa are threading the needle fairly well. A few low key moves. Don't break anything. And they have directions to go if they find themselves needing to.
 

Fryowa

Administrator
My experience (albeit limited to two games in the last 4 years) is that Iowa does not have the problem. They might be worried about it? But they do not have the problem. A solid balance between game and party. The stuff they've added (stuff on the plaza, beer sales, etc) feel more like low-key additions. They haven't had to pull stunts. I imagine, as the article states, it's isolated to the smaller schools. I hope Iowa never has to worry about it. I just don't see it in the short term.
This is why Iowa is the best B1G tailgate destination bar none. I haven't been to UM but I know enough people who have, and Rutgers...well...it's Rutgers.
 

dagdaj

Well-Known Member
I never even get looked at. I have my ticket pulled up when I get to the first gate person and wave me right on to the ticket scanner dude.

We had a clear bag with a towel, a bottle of water, some panchos etc.
We could have easily had two full bottles of liquor hidden away in there. We went through a line that had a bag check. Nobody even stopped us. At one point my wife even said to a guy in the uniform "where's the bag check?" (to be fair, her experience is MLB and NHL where they will physically go through your bag after you went through a metal detector)...and he was like "I already looked".

Granted, we're middle aged parent looking people.

But hey, middle aged parent people sometimes drink and do stupid stuff. I felt a little insulted.
Then again, we also didn't have anything in the bag we shouldn't have. Except a Polar Springs bottle that was unsealed because I'd refilled it.
 

BigD

Well-Known Member
Watching Tory Taylor punt in person when you can see the entire field is more impressive than anything else out there, defense included. You can’t get a sense of the difficulty level of what he does by watching on TV. It’s unbelievable.

Taylor is a true generational talent.

I hope Iowa makes it to a bowl game out West somewhere because I would love to see him in person.
 

MelroseHawkins

Well-Known Member
Kinnick is the best tailgate experience in the Big Ten. The fact that it’s a hodge podge of frat houses, parking lots, bars (I love Stella), and street vendors all slammed in the middle of a residential area half the size of other schools makes it as quaint as a drunken sailor-fest can be. Schools like ISU, Penn State, and others that have parking lot metropolises for tailgating are fucking boring and have zero personality. No panache whatsoever. Iowa City has that panache.

How many other places can you walk down the middle of the street, right past three cops, with a half a twelve pack of Twisted teas on your shoulder like a boom box slamming Coors Light tall boys? Not very many.

To be a college student again….

You know you made me Google panache.
 

MelroseHawkins

Well-Known Member
When they finally figured out that kiboshing open containers on gameday was 1) futile, and 2) counterproductive to their wallets and started letting people walk around with beers and cocktails freely again...they also figured out the balance between the Barney Fifes and Bert Kreischers.

I think it has to do also with a different generation of cops. Back in the day it was mostly older upper 40s early 50s cops looking for some overtime who didn't have anything better to do than try and bust all the college punks. Now that college football is so much more of an event and crowds are so much bigger it's pretty much all hands on deck and the cops tend to be younger and more lenient. Hell before the Nevada game my buddy and I talked to a sheriff's deputy on Melrose for probably 20 minutes and had a pretty cool conversation. Said buddy was double fisting Busch Lattes and drank 'em right there in front of the cop. Never a word was said and he never even got a sideways look.

My bud at work lives by a sheriff who works the game on gamedays. He said before one of the games they had a meeting and it was stated that, paraphrase - "Ok, we aren't going to plan to arrest anyone or take anyone in, unless, they are absolutely being unruly or in a state to harm someone or themselves." As a matter of fact, they did run into a young unruly kid who was drunk as $uck and obnoxious. One of the cops actually commented "Damn it, we need to take guy in". So, they really try not to take anyone in.

Pretty much said their intention is not to come down on anybody for enjoying themselves as long as acting civil.
 
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Fryowa

Administrator
My bud at work lives by a sheriff who works around Kinnick on gamedays. He said before one of the games they had a meeting and it was stated that, paraphrase - "Ok, we aren't going to plan to arrest anyone or take anyone in, unless, they are absolutely being unruly or in a state to harm someone or themselves."

Pretty much said their intention is not to come down on anybody for enjoying themselves as long as acting civil.
Exactly the way it should be.

If you're puking, passed out, bumping into people, being profane around kids, or starting shit you probably need a ride dahn-tahn. I actually err on the side of being somewhat strict with idiots, because if the cops are allowing public intox and open containers as long as everyone plays nice, that's a privilege and I don't want people fucking it up for the one's who can keep their shit together.

If you're walking down the street with a couple beers and minding your own business with buds, I see no problem with it.
 

LoyalSon

Well-Known Member
As for the OP's question, I'm no spring chicken anymore, but I wouldn't skip the gameday experience for anything. Yes, TV timeouts are annoying, but that's what brings in the B1G bucks, and is certainly not unique to Kinnick.

Although my initial reaction to beer sales was negative due to so many people coming and going for beer that it made it hard to watch the game, I think the novelty has worn off a bit as I see less people coming and going this year. I think they need to go to beer in cups only, though, after seeing cans thrown on the field during the ISU game.

I agree with the observation that you don't need to worry about law enforcement unless you are truly being an A--Hole.

My one big complaint is that during the last renovation they replaced the troughs in the mens' restrooms with urinals. It takes a lot longer to get through the line than it ever used to.
 
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