No Huddle v. UpTempo

BrueCrew3

Well-Known Member

From Jon's Media Day: The Big Theme post:
... By the way, don’t get no huddle confused with automatically being uptempo. I would look for Iowa to change some speeds…fastballs and change ups. Using the no huddle limits what type of substitutions a defense can make and may force them to stay in base formations more often than they would like...


I can't tell you how many football games I go to where one team uses a no-huddle and the fans in the stands complain because ".. .. I thought they were running no huddle .. .. why is it taking so long to get the play off .. .. " and similar comments.


The bold above is one of the primary reasons to use the no-huddle. And if they try to substitute, you snap the ball early before the defense is set and either catch them off guard or they get caught with too many men on the field.


The point, however, is to wear down the defense to where you can push them around and move the ball. Is it effective early? Sometimes, but you really see the results late in the first half and in the second half.


Just my 2¢ .. ..

GO HAWKS!!!
 

hawkeyebob62

Well-Known Member

From Jon's Media Day: The Big Theme post:
... By the way, don’t get no huddle confused with automatically being uptempo. I would look for Iowa to change some speeds…fastballs and change ups. Using the no huddle limits what type of substitutions a defense can make and may force them to stay in base formations more often than they would like...


I can't tell you how many football games I go to where one team uses a no-huddle and the fans in the stands complain because ".. .. I thought they were running no huddle .. .. why is it taking so long to get the play off .. .. " and similar comments.


The bold above is one of the primary reasons to use the no-huddle. And if they try to substitute, you snap the ball early before the defense is set and either catch them off guard or they get caught with too many men on the field.


The point, however, is to wear down the defense to where you can push them around and move the ball. Is it effective early? Sometimes, but you really see the results late in the first half and in the second half.


Just my 2¢ .. ..

GO HAWKS!!!

D'Antonio has the no-huddle figured out, IMO.
 

kicker22

Well-Known Member
D'Antonio has the no-huddle figured out, IMO.

I'm sure all those players that got hurt and miraculously reentered a few plays later were hurt, but just sucked it up and played through it. I can't believe the rules committee lets them get away with that. Easy way to fix it would be if the game is stopped for an injury or in MSU's case, faking an injuy, that player cannot reenter until the next change of possession. The fact is, although there isn't a rule in place, its incredibly weak and a definite advantage used to slow down an offense.
 

kicker22

Well-Known Member
In response to OT, I agree completely. I've been under the impression from day one that its incorporated into the offense to create mismatches in personnel. I don't think its going to be that much faster of a pace then we've seen in the past and definitely not going to be this new spread offense that's high tempo. I expect us to remain prostyle and continue to pound the ball. Anyone expecting Oregon or a Texas Tech hurry up approach may be in for a rude awakening.
 
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