Nile Kinnick and The Ironmen - Great Article

MelroseHawkins

Well-Known Member
I never realized that the team in the '30's had that severe of NCAA sanctions against them and were literally shunned by conference teams that would not schedule them. No wonder they had such a drought of success.

The ironic thing is that Iowa had a much worse treatment with sanctions and shunning for recruiting violations than Penn St. had for their horrific "lack of institutional control" situation with the child molestation deal. Penn St. got off relatively unscathed after a couple years. Iowa took a decade to recover, and were lucky to get Eddie Anderson to get a small group of guys to gut it out to succeed to get the program on track again.

Just a great article covering those players and that time frame at Iowa.

 

HuckFinn

Well-Known Member
I never realized that the team in the '30's had that severe of NCAA sanctions against them and were literally shunned by conference teams that would not schedule them. No wonder they had such a drought of success.

The ironic thing is that Iowa had a much worse treatment with sanctions and shunning for recruiting violations than Penn St. had for their horrific "lack of institutional control" situation with the child molestation deal. Penn St. got off relatively unscathed after a couple years. Iowa took a decade to recover, and were lucky to get Eddie Anderson to get a small group of guys to gut it out to succeed to get the program on track again.

Just a great article covering those players and that time frame at Iowa.

Well. That was a great way to spend some time this afternoon. Many highlights, both familiar and new to me in the article. I was glad to see that it was indeed a heroic gesture when Nile refused to land on the carrier and instead ditched his plane. I had heard that fact, but not so I could confirm it until now. And, a new surprise. I did not know he exited the plane. That makes his death even more tragic.
 

MelroseHawkins

Well-Known Member
Well. That was a great way to spend some time this afternoon. Many highlights, both familiar and new to me in the article. I was glad to see that it was indeed a heroic gesture when Nile refused to land on the carrier and instead ditched his plane. I had heard that fact, but not so I could confirm it until now. And, a new surprise. I did not know he exited the plane. That makes his death even more tragic.

The first time I listened to his Heisman speech, it sent chills up my back. Not kidding. The young man was so ahead of his time, so eloquent and well spoken, and as the article often references, so presidential. He really was such a very unique student athlete.

We would never hear a speech anything close to that this day in age or even going back 30 years. I like how the reporters stated how it affected them.

It would have been interesting to see where his life would have taken him if not for the tragic accident serving our country.
 

HuckFinn

Well-Known Member
The first time I listened to his Heisman speech, it sent chills up my back. Not kidding. The young man was so ahead of his time, so eloquent and well spoken, and as the article often references, so presidential. He really was such a very unique student athlete.

We would never hear a speech anything close to that this day in age or even going back 30 years. I like how the reporters stated how it affected them.

It would have been interesting to see where his life would have taken him if not for the tragic accident serving our country.
His comments about the plight of the “Negro” race was heart breaking and so ahead of the curve.
 

Luftgekuehlt67

Well-Known Member
That 1939 team, for me, is just so emblematic of The Iowa Way.

Obviously, you can't say enough about Nile. He was only, what, 24 or so when he died, but yet it takes almost no stretching of the imagination to picture him as Governor, US Senator, or even beyond. So intelligent, thoughtful, compassionate, principled...on and on. What a loss, war sucks.

But, moving past Kinnick, just the vibe of that team, it's so "Iowa" it's astounding. If you think Iowa was a talent laden powerhouse program in those days, think again. Kinnick was just the most visible of a gang of tough, scrappy, never say never types. Toughness and execution over raw talent. Sound familiar?

Football was a different game back then for sure. Scores were lower and, accordingly, margins were closer. But that team played, and won, one dogfight after another.

6-1-1 but could have very easily been 1-7. Indeed, the 1938 team, with many of the same players but under less capable leadership, did go 1-6-1.

Then as it is now, as I say all the time on here, margins for Iowa football are razor thin.
 
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